Killer Car Features

Tue 06 Sep

As car manufacturers work tirelessly to come up with new ideas and gadgets to make your car an even safer place, we chose to look back fondly at the truly terrible ideas for features in our cars over the years.

Features that were so bad, they actually made the cars dangerous to be in for you and your passengers.

So here are the world's worst car features that we can now look back on and think, 'How did these ever get approved?!'

In-Car Bar

In Car Bar

Back in the 60's and 70's, being drunk behind the wheel was a test of character and coordination.

These days, however, the true dangers of drinking behind the wheel are well known, and driving under the influence is the quickest way to say goodbye to your license - and your life.

That said, we just cannot work out why the minibar in the glove compartment of the Cadillac Eldorado Brougham was such a short lived feature in the automotive industry.

The magnets on the bottom of the shot glasses were ingenious in avoiding spilling your scotch on your floor mats, however the fact that there is an open bottle of scotch in your car is probably a sign that things were not going to end well.

Automatic Seat Belts

Automatic Seatbelt

Seatbelts; the most important piece of safety equipment in your car?

Since you are ten times more likely to be killed in a road crash if you aren't wearing a seatbelt, we think they're a pretty good idea.

Why the automatic seat belt needed to be invented, however, is anyone's guess.

First introduced in the Volkswagen Rabbit, then the Chevrolet Chevette, the automatic seat belt mechanically fitted itself around the occupant without the need to buckle yourself in - that was the good part.

The bad part? The seatbelt got in the way of the side airbags, and if the car was involved in an accident that forced the car door open - the passenger would get ejected straight out of the car.

Seat belt? Yes. Safety belt? Not at all.


All this talk of dangerous cars got you ready to get into one of your own? Give our consultants a call - safety guaranteed.


VW Vase

VW Vase

VW has a knack for designing cars that are adored by the nature-loving, Hippie community of the 1970's. Whether it was the surfside staple Kombi Van, or the cute/strange looking Beetle.

It's no surprise then, that VW offers an 'in-car vase' as an optional extra for their cars. An idea first brought to life in the 50's, but still available in cars today.

It is a great addition for the green-thumbs amongst us, but a truly terrible idea for those who want unobstructed vision, and who can't see through a vase full of sunflowers as they drive at 100km/h down a highway.

Although hanging fluffy-dice from your rear-view mirror is illegal in Australia due to their distracting qualities, there is nothing to say that having a bouquet of budding blossoms catch your eye will get you in any trouble with the law.

Dog Sack

Dog Sack

All dog owners know the conundrum; wanting to take our dogs with us on car trips to the beach, but not wanting to put up with the 'wet-dog smell' on the way home.

Conundrum no more!

In 1935, Popular Mechanics magazine announced the end to that issue with a new product, The Dog Sack.

After a fun-filled day of soaking up the sun, sand and surf at the beach, all you have to do is tuck Rover into this cosy sack attached to the outside of the passenger car door, then drive home along the busy highway - leaving your canine companion free to enjoy the wind in his hair, and the car fumes in his lungs. Plus, the ability to get up-close-and-personal with those drivers next to you, who like to veer slightly out of their lane.

Pro: No more dents in the side of your car.

Con: Your dog doesn't handle dents as well as your car door does.

Not exactly dangerous for occupants inside of the car, but definitely dangerous for those hanging outside of it.


On the hunt for a car that has a minibar or automatic seat belts included? Good luck.
After something a little safer? stratton can help!
Get started with a 60-second quote here, or give us a call on 1300 STRATTON

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